About your Search

20130101
20130131
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
say i don't want to be the next guy to lose to christine o'donnell? >> i think you are absolutely right and something i've been concerned about but i will report back from c-pac in marc and let you know because as you know, the conservative political action conference happening every year is a place where rising stars and incoming stars are trotted around the halls and put up on stages and meant to meet and greet and get to know them and make a splash, they meet the media. in fact, last year i met richard mourdock before we knew who he was. ted cruz, too, a full year before the actual election. so i'm really interested to see not just who they bring out, but the kinds of messages that are put up on these stages. and whether the party's going to be exercising some discipline this year because i know that they're using cpac and looking to cpac this year as an opportunity to say, restart, reset, rebrand. >> right. >> i hope that works because we have got a lot to offer if we can do it right. >> i think it's not just so much what they say but also how the audience receives what is sai
the cliff and vote for christine o'donnell or richard murdoch or sharon engel when they had a chance to vote for republicans that would have beaten democratic candidates. if you look at the mistakes we made in the primary process simply because we've had this ideological litmus test over the past, again, two election cycle, we've made harry reid, we have, not democrats, we've made harry reid the majority leader again. we just got to start playing smafrter. >> a better candidate than sharon engel. his polls were terrible. joe, let me say something else. i worked for reagan, okay. reagan was a big tent guy. he was inclusive. in his administration we had moderate republicans, we had conservative republicans, we had supply siders like myself, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. can we go back to reagan's model, can we open up the party a little bit. you know what i'm thinking about particularly. this whole issue about immigration, latino, african-americans, young people, joe the whole party is missing a whole demonstrato graphic in this country? >> no doubt about it. one of my biggest criticisms ab
idealogues take part in the process. they're still going to have them nominate something like christine o'donnell and then lose a general election. >> looking at the party to look at in terms of their future, a lot of people are looking at their past and what they can learn from that. in "forbes" today they write about the republican idea machine saying it may be hard to remember but republicans were an idea machine and churned out innovative policy ideas for addressing public policy issues. today, not so much. the republicans seem to be a vacuum is the common complaint of friends on the right. is that the biggest thing to learn about the gop is that they're not really churning out the ideas anymore, what they say is no all the time to the big ideas coming up on the hill? >> i think what we are seeing is on issues like immigration, for instance, a nonstarter, you know, in the past two years, that they're really now taking a -- trying to take a lead because they see this as one of the issues if they don't make inroads with the hispanic voters they will have a hard time winning in a lot of states a
candidates. without christine o'donnell, sharon angle, ken buck,ed to akin and richard mourdock, the party might today control the senate. how careful must be the republican picks be? tell us about the bench. we don't seem to talk about a deep bench for them. >> this might be the most fascinating story, more fascinating than the retirements themselves. in iowa there's a very conservative congressman, steve king, who might be eyeing the senate seat now vacated by tom ma harkin. he would have a great chance of winning a republican primary. in a general election it would be pretty tough. we're also going to see a very tough primary perhaps in georgia. and it will be interesting to see in west virginia whether the establishment republican running ends up getting a primary for the right. i think this is going to be the big dynamic to watch over the next year or so, thomas. >> let's look at massachusetts, though. there's a new poll out for former senator scott brown with an eight-point lead over the democratic party's generic candidate. then a 20-point lead over the democratic senatorial committ
mourdock in indiana, christine o'donnell in delaware. you see the strength of the grassroots. that's why the grading systems are so effective, because they put somebody on a target list for grassroots conservative organizations to take out in a primary, and if you go to their website, it's very slick. it's very well-done. very easy to click on somebody. you can see six or seven votes, and the way in which they penalize people for a vote that ordinarily would just be a common thing to take, for example something that might not be completely offset, let's say you're from a coastal area and you're supporting something -- some government money to go there for rebuilding if you get hit for a storm. that doesn't align. sorry if you're from louisiana, from florida. done. you might be the most conservative person of all time but because you voted to help out your district, you're going to get an "x" right there. it's really quite remarkable. >> it's absolutely incredible. clarence, heritage action is what's known as a social welfare organization. that means it can and has spent money on races. s
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)